What’s my role in the Process?

Once you have decided that you want to use mediation to resolve your issues you may wonder what you will be required to do.

You may feel anxious about facing the other party, or that you won’t be able to communicate the things that are important to you.

Most people are unsure of how it will all work out at the start of the process.

Don’t worry you are in safe hands.

We will work hard to ensure that any concerns you may have are addressed and that the sessions remain focused and you both have an equal voice.

All you have to do is :

  • Come to the sessions prepared to participate.
  • Be willing to discuss the issues in an open and honest way.
  • Agree to listen carefully and really consider what is being said before rushing to respond.
  • Be respectful and behave in a non-aggressive manner towards the other party and Mediators

How Does Mediation Work?

There are a number of stages in the process;

Initial Meeting

Introduction – The mediators will meet with both parties for the first time and explain the process to you both and answer any questions you may have and assess whether they believe,  if  your situation is suitable for mediation or not.

You are seen individually so that we can explore issues with each of you to gain a full understanding of your situation and what you wish to achieve.  This gives you the opportunity to share whatever you wish with us in private and in complete confidence.  We may also ask you to outline what is the best case scenario and the worst case scenario you could imagine as an outcome in your case. We all meet up and you both outline the situation and the issues you wish to address during the mediation process and we draw up an agenda for future session(s).

Follow on Sessions – Mediation sessions are arranged as necessary until all the issues on your agenda have been discussed and you have agreed the way forward.

Written Agreement – Finally we produce a written agreement, which is simply a record of what you both have discussed and jointly signed up to be bound by. It can also be used by your legal representatives as the basis of a  legal agreement.

What techniques do Mediators use?

httpv://youtu.be/jMY24w7OZ9w

-Ask thought provoking questions

-Reality check the parties understanding of a particular point or issues

-Use proven techniques such as visualization and display tools to help the individuals better understand the respective positions.

-Move the parties away from positions and move them towards focusing on interests

Our mediators are trained and highly experienced to be able to assist you to find the best possible outcome that is acceptable to you both. To do this they will use a number of tried and tested methods they will;

  • Ask lots of questions and sometimes to play ‘Devil’s Advocate’.
  • Encourage discussion regarding the options that are identified as potential solutions.
  • Challenge the reality of proposed solutions. During the sessions you may hear the mediators ask…

–   ‘ Ok so how will that work out in reality’

‘Can I just check, have you thought about how you will manage to collect the baby when you are at work at 6am’?

‘If you do give the house to x and the children, how will you afford somewhere else; where will you live’?

  • Encourage the parties to work through each of the issues they have identified as being important to reach a solution that is practical and agreeable to both sides.
  • Challenge the clients where necessary when they can only see their own perspective.
  • Encourage even the smallest agreements and build on the positives especially when parties get stuck or feel they can’t see a way out.
  • Manage emotional times. We encourage ‘time- out’ if things get heated or individuals are upset.

What is Mediation?


Many people ask us what is mediation? Some people believe the process is something like meditation.

Other people believe that mediation is a form of marriage or relationship counselling. This is not the case.

Mediation is a voluntary,  impartial and confidential process where people in a dispute with each other , focus on finding solutions that they can both agree on, resolving the issues they are  facing, with the help  of independent facilitators known as mediators.

Mediators are not there to judge, offer legal advice or make decisions or offer solutions in relation to what they think you should do. They remain totally impartial  and will not take sides. Sometimes they may play ‘Devil’s Advocate’ and ask tough questions  simply to clarify a particular point.

Mediation is a future focused discussion between two parties assisted by trained Mediators aiming for a ‘win/win’ resolution.

It is a voluntary process- both parties have to agree to take part no-one is forcing them.

Neutral / Non Judgmental – the Mediator will not take sides or show bias towards either party.

It’s a confidential process – any notes taken by the mediators are destroyed at the end of the process. Mediators will not appear in any court hearings on behalf of either party.

It is not – Advisory – we will not advise people what they should do – there will be times when we will ask clients to seek legal / financial advice on topics that arise.

A soft option – it can be really hard work at times, facing difficult issues and finding a workable solution.

What Clients Can Expect

A controlled, welcoming, business-like environment.

Guidance through the process, which enables them to focus on the issues and explore possible solutions through to reaching an agreement

The Role Of The Mediator

You may be wondering what the Mediators will actually do during the sessions?

Our mediators are trained and highly experienced to be able to assist you to find the best possible outcome that is acceptable to you both. To do this they will use a number of tried and tested methods they will;

  • Ask lots of questions and sometimes to play ‘Devil’s Advocate’.
  • Encourage discussion regarding the options that are identified as potential solutions.
  • Challenge the reality of proposed solutions.
  • During the sessions, you may hear the mediators ask

Ok so how will that work out in reality

Can I just check – have you thought about how you will manage to collect the baby when you are at work at 6am?.

If you do give the house to x and the children, how will you afford somewhere else; where will you live? Take out or keep in ?

Encourage the parties to work through each of the issues they have identified as being important to reach a solution that is practical and agreeable to both sides.

Challenge the clients where necessary when they can only see their own perspective.

Encourage even the smallest agreements and build on the positives especially when parties get stuck or feel they can’t see a way out.

Manage emotional times We encourage ‘time- out’ if things get heated.

Your Role in the Mediation

Once you have decided that you want to use mediation to resolve your issues you may wonder what you will be required to do.

You may feel anxious about facing the other party, or that you won’t be able to communicate the things that are important to you.

Most people are unsure of how if will all work out at the start of the process. Don’t worry you are in safe hands.

We will work hard to ensure that any concerns you may have are addressed and that the sessions remain focused and you both have an equal voice.


All you have to do is;

  • Come to the sessions prepared to participate.
  • Be willing to discuss the issues in an open and honest way.
  • Agree to listen carefully and really consider what is being said before rushing to respond.
  • Be respectful and behave in a non-aggressive manner towards the other party and Mediators

What is the process about?

Mediation is a future focused discussion between two parties assisted by trained Mediators aiming for a ‘win/win’ resolution.

It is a voluntary process– both parties have to agree to take part no-one is forcing them.

Neutral / Non Judgmental – the Mediator will not take sides or show bias towards either party.

It’s a confidential process – any notes taken by the mediators are destroyed at the end of the process. Mediators will not appear in any court hearings on behalf of either party.

It is not

Advisory – we will not advise people what they should do – there will be times when we will ask clients to seek legal / financial advice on topics that arise.
A soft option – it can be really hard work, facing difficult issues and finding a workable solution.

What Clients Can Expect

A controlled, welcoming, business-like environment.

Guidance through the process, which enables them to focus on the issues and explore possible solutions through to reaching an agreement.

How Does It Work?

There are a number of stages in the process;

Initial Meeting

1. Introduction – The mediators will meet with you both for the first time and explain the process to you both and answer any questions you may have.

2. You are seen individually so that we can explore issues with each of you to gain a full understanding of your situation. This is confidential and you can share whatever you wish with us in private.

3. We all meet up and you both outline the situation and the issues you wish to address during the mediation process and we draw up an agenda for future session(s).

Follow on Sessions

Mediation sessions are arranged as necessary until all the issues on your agenda have been discussed and you have agreed the way forward.

Written Agreement

Finally we produce a written agreement., which is simply a record of what both parties have discussed and jointly signed up to be bound by. It can also be used by your legal representatives as the basis of a